Help With Adhd Coaching

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Coaching for ADD and ADHD

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In recent years ADHD coaching has emerged among the many approaches, services and treatments for ADHD. Coaching can give the individual with ADHD a means to achieve their goals.  Coaching does not stop ADHD, however it does help those that struggle on a day to day basis make their lives less frustrating and overwhelming.  It allows them to live a more productive and fulfilling life.


Coaching can be of great benefit in helping parents, spouses and siblings to cope with the frustrations and difficulties associated with the thinking processes of an ADHD mind.  ADHD Coaching is often considered for adults only, however teens and children may also benefit greatly from ADHD Coaching.

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Coaching is a relatively new field that has become more prominent in recent years. In general, coaches help individuals reach their fullest potential in life. As a specialty within the broader field of coaching.
“ADHD Coaching focuses on the specific needs of the individual being coached. Like all coaching, it is a supportive, goal-oriented process in which the coach and the client work to develop the tools, strategies and confidence necessary to help the client reach his or her potential. ” “The ADHD Coaching Model” By Nancy Rattey Strategic Life Coach

What Is ADHD Coaching

The difference between ADHD coaching and other coaching processes is that the coach is trained and experienced in working with people with ADHD and is capable of helping that person develop strategies which maximize the talents of the ADHD brain and compensate for the individual difficulties the ADHD client experiences.Typically, this type of coaching helps individuals with ADHD develop the structures, processes, and practical approaches necessary to meet the challenges of everyday life and excel in their areas of special talents.
If an adult with ADHD needs assistance primarily in dealing with the practical challenges in daily life, a coach may be a good person to help. If the adult needs assistance with emotional, psychiatric, or interpersonal problems, then a therapist should be consulted. If an adult with ADHD needs both types of assistance, it may be helpful to select a coach and a therapist, and ask them to work with each other.

Treatment for ADHD in adults and children has typically been defined in terms of medication and therapy. Coaching is emerging as another form of help that can benefit many people with ADHD. Coaches deal with problems in everyday living such as organization, time management, memory, follow–through, and motivation. Coaches focus on what, when and how—not why. They are not trained to address psychiatric, emotional and interpersonal problems, which should be addressed by mental health professionals. Through formal educational programs, mental health professionals (e.g. psychiatrists, psychologists, clinical social workers, psychiatric nurse practitioners, marriage and family therapists) are trained to diagnose and treat mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, personality disorders, and interpersonal difficulties. They also must have a license to practice. Therapists work primarily through face–to–face contacts while many coaches also work by telephone or e–mail. Depending on an individual's diagnosis, the mental health professional may employ a number of psychotherapeutic approaches such as cognitive-behavior therapy and behavior modification.
 (For more on the behavioral Therapies) The goal of therapy is generally to help clients address the symptoms and problems that brought them to therapy in the first place. Often, mental health professionals take a "problem–centered" approach to therapy rather than a "client–centered" approach; treatment lasts until the specific problem is no longer causing significant impairment and disruption to the client.

Medication alone is seldom if ever sufficient treatment for ADHD however. Many therapists who work diligently with their clients on emotional issues, relationship issues, and behavioral strategies to increase productivity, are perplexed to find that the therapeutic goals are simply not being implemented on any consistent basis. The client’s failure to follow through may be interpreted, quite inaccurately, as “resistance” to treatment. A working knowledge of the benefits of ADHD coaching would allow all these professionals to be more effective in treating their ADD clients.
Even the behavior therapies have limits when it comes to helping individuals with ADHD who live in the moment, respond to the immediate, having difficulty anticipating and looking ahead, or simply forget what the behavioral goals were from a few days ago. This is where effective ADHD coaching can take planning, organization, pragmatism, and accountability to another level.
Defining Coaching and Therapy
Therapy is by nature a mode of “treatment,” involving the application of therapeutic techniques and remedies to relieve problems related to a disorder that fits within DSM-IV diagnostic categories  (The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is the standard classification of mental disorders used by mental health professionals in the United States) , as well as to deal with problems of daily living. Licensed therapists earn an advanced degree in a formal training program, and must pass a licensing exam in their state.
Coaching is based more on a holistic or “wellness” model, intended to improve daily functioning and well-being for individuals without significant psychological impairment. This places coaching more in the realm of an educational process as opposed to a treatment process. There are no training programs for coaches in colleges or universities, no formal degrees, and no oversight by state licensing boards.

Coaches deal with problems in everyday living such as organization, time management, memory, follow–through, and motivation. Coaches focus on what, when and how—never why. They are not trained to address psychiatric, emotional and interpersonal problems, which should be addressed by mental health professionals. The coach takes on a very pragmatic, hands-on approach.
He or she may collaborate with a professional organizer who goes into the client’s home or office to
help the person better organize and use physical space. Anyone with ADHD who has lived with clutter
and disorganization can appreciate the value of that! Coaches may help clients organize working areas,
living areas, set up storage and filing systems, even organize bedroom closets. Setting priorities, clearly
defining goals, and allocating time on a weekly planner for each required activity is a basic strategy that
almost all those withADHD benefit from. Keeping on top of one’s schedule to the point that routines get
established takes time and lots of effort. Again, having contact with a trusted ally several times during
the week helps the client remember and follow through on planned activities. This is helpful for most
people, but crucial for those with ADHD. Coaching has limited benefit, and may be very inappropriate,
for individuals with significant emotional or psychological problems. If those problems are evident at
the start of coaching, or develop later on during the coaching process, the coach will refer the client to
a therapist. This requires that a well trained coach has a general knowledge of psychopathology and is
able to recognize when he or she is faced with a problem for which coaching is not appropriate. A close
working relationship with a therapist helps to clarify diagnostic issues.

Through formal educational programs, mental health professionals (e.g. psychiatrists, psychologists, clinical social workers, psychiatric nurse practitioners, marriage and family therapists) are trained to diagnose and treat mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, personality disorders, and interpersonal difficulties. They also must have a license to practice. Therapists work primarily through face–to–face contacts while many coaches also work by telephone or e–mail. Therapy is by nature a mode of “treatment,” involving the application of therapeutic techniques and remedies to relieve problems related to a disorder that fits within DSM-IV diagnostic categories,* as well as to deal with problems of daily living. Licensed therapists earn an advanced degree in a formal training program, and must pass a licensing exam in their state
.
ADHD Coaching Credentials
There is currently no specialized schooling or licensing required to become a coach or a coach who specializes in ADHD. ADHD coaches often have different educational and professional backgrounds and diverse knowledge about ADHD. Many coaches, including those who work with individuals with ADHD, seek credentialing through the International Coach Federation (ICF), an international association of personal and business coaching that is evolving as the principal governing body for this field. General requirements and more information on guidelines and accredited coach training programs can be found on the ICF Web site (www.coachfederation.org). The ICF recognizes ADHD coaching as a special area of expertise. Because coaching is a very broad field with many areas of subspecialty, adults with ADHD should ask potential coaches about their experience with ADHD and coach–specific training in ADHD as well as their credential status.
Because the coaching field is still in its infancy, much remains to be done to establish practice standards and ethics. In 2002, a task force of coaches organized by the Attention Deficit Disorder Association (ADDA) wrote "The Guiding Principles for Coaching Individuals with Attention Deficit Disorder."2 This document proposes the essential elements of ADHD coaching, establishes standards, and outlines ethical principles to help people better understand ADHD coaching and field standards.
 ADHD And ADD  [For the purposes of simplicity we will primarily use the term ADHD (which is Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder).  However much of the information included in this text will include ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) which is obviously not characterized by hyperactivity.]

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Utilizing the services of ADHD Coaching can be a very convenient and time effective way to seek help as most ADHD coaches are

able to provide their expertise via phone, email and SKYPE.  This means you have the luxury of choosing from a nationwide pool talent.


Look here for a Nationwide List of Professional and Certified ADHD Coaches